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Tissue Dispersers

Tissue dispersers are the starting point when isolating individual cells from small samples of soft tissue. The action of these mechanical devices alone, or sometimes in combination with enzymatic treatment, is gentle enough to disperse fresh tissue into individual, viable cells. It should be noted that these devices are not totally efficient. In the process, some cells will not be viable and some of the tissue remains as aggregates.

DuelingSyringes™ Tissue Disperser

DuelingSyringes™ Tissue Disperser

A low cost, disposable, tissue disperser for up to 100 mg samples of soft tissue (e.g., liver, brain and muscle).  The Dueling Syringes™ tissue disperser is a significant improvement over the classic "syringe-needle-syringe" method of tissue dispersion.  The needle is replaced with an embedded 500 micron stainless steel screen inside a 1 ml polycarbonate syringe.  Manual passage of the sample back and forth through the screen is fast, gentle and efficient.  Sold as a pack of five pairs of syringes.

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MicroMincer

MicroMincer

Cat. No. 2941, MicroMincer laboratory press complete with 10 pack of liner/seals
Cat. No. 294103, Ten pack of extra liner/seals

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Screw Tissue Press

Screw Tissue Press

The Screw Tissue Press is a classic screw press, designed to efficiently macerate or mechanically disaggregate 5 to 50 grams of fresh, soft plant or animal tissue. By 'soft' we mean nonfibrous tissue like brain, liver, muscle, potato, callus, etc.  Tough or fibrous tissues like leaves or skin will not pass through the stainless steel screen.

The Screw Tissue Press is used as a mincing step for isolation of single cells or the extraction of intracellular components such as nuclei and mitochondria. Unlike other tissue dispersion/blending devices, no added water or buffer is required in its operation.  See Narendra P Singh, et. al. for preparation of viable single cell suspensions  [DNA double-stranded breaks in mouse kidney cells with age, Narendra P Singh et. al., Biogerontology 2, 261-270 (2001)].

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